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City of Dayton Takes Big Step in Becoming a More Sustainable Community

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The City of Dayton is taking a significant step in reducing its negative impact on climate change by sourcing energy from renewable resources for several of its facilities. This commitment to renewable energy delivers on Dayton's long-standing promise to practice and promote environmental stewardship.

At the end of this year, IGS Energy, the City’s longtime electric supplier, will transition several facilities to a 100% renewable energy product through the procurement of green power from hydro-power resources. This new agreement will help reduce the City’s carbon footprint, while still saving taxpayer dollars from the general fund. 

“Climate change is one of the most urgent challenges of our time, and I am excited that the City of Dayton is doing our part as an organization to reduce our carbon footprint,” said Mayor Nan Whaley. "This agreement is a critical first step in a series of moves aimed to remake Dayton into a more sustainable and resilient community."

Last year, City Manager Shelley Dickstein created and appointed a sustainability manager responsible for advancing the City's overall sustainability objectives and to develop critical relationships with internal and external partners.

"Reducing greenhouse gas emissions is essential to any meaningful climate action plan,"

said Shelley Dickstein, Dayton City Manager. "This investment in green energy also saves the taxpayers money, further demonstrating that we can do the right thing while also making wise financial investments.”

Additionally, the City is currently exploring other energy improvements, transportation changes, enhanced solid waste management measures, and transitioning many of the City's existing fleet of internal combustion engine vehicles to electric.

The benefit of Dayton’s decision to source green electricity will save the yearly equivalent of greenhouse gas emissions produced by an average passenger vehicle driven 45 million miles.